Eekeemoo

What Did I Learn?

weekly webcomic reviews by Delos

(this is a repost)

Here we’ll take a look at Eekeemoo by Willy MJ.This comic pushes a few boundaries. I have to prepare you before you view it; I can’t quite follow what’s going on at some points and I wouldn’t expect you to. I was quite relieved to see this comment by Willy MJ: “I came up with the idea for eekeemoo when I was travelling in South America a few years back. While I was on one of those really, really painfully switch backing train rides through Peru. I put down it’s plot, where it was going to be set and how the narrative was going to be told (silent and symbolic). But that was it!

… So when I chose Eekeemoo as my Sketch Book Adventure and began to draw it. I knew where I was going and how I was travelling there, but not what I was going to see. That’s what makes Eekeemoo so refreshing for me as a comic artist. It is a real stream of conscious piece and I don’t know where the incidentals of the story will take me.”

Incidentally, this comic is not silent. Oh sure, there is no dialogue in the normal sense but as you read it through you’ll hear sounds in your mind. I kind of imagine a brooding yet energetic soundtrack with spots of intense, overpowering sound. I can also clearly hear the characters falling, swimming and even picking things up.

The vertical presentation is quite interesting with its symbolism and stark black and (off) whites. It creates a very unique sensation as you read through the episodes. On the Flight Forums, there is even a comment made that even though there is no snow where the commenter lives, they can feel the snow. That’s a pretty powerful effect on your audience.

One thing I want to get back to is that stream of conciousness thing mentioned in the review. He knows where he’s heading with the story and he’s revealing it as he pleases, which is a very relaxing way of experiencing a story. There is a certain line of thinking that everything must be planned out to create a good story, with its three act structure and rising tension methodically implemented to drive the story faster and faster toward its conclusion. Eeekeemo is a nice counterpoint to that.

What did I learn?

What sort of background music would represent my comic? What other senses can be encouraged and engaged in my audience as they read it? Am I telling the story my way or am I rushing through it because I think it’s supposed to be done that way? After you read through Eekeemoo, you may wish to read the full interview on WillyMJ.com and follow the series in the Flight Forums.

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